Poll shows most public school teachers not satisfied with DepEd response to their needs

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Most public school teachers are not satisfied with the support they receive from the Department of Education, a survey conducted by advocacy group Movement for Safe, Equitable, Quality, and Relevant Education showed. (FILE PHOTO)

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, August 18) —Most public school teachers are not satisfied with the support they receive from the Department of Education, a survey conducted by advocacy group Movement for Safe, Equitable, Quality, and Relevant Education showed.

The poll conducted from June to July this year included 1,278 public elementary and high school teachers.

In an online forum, the group said 70% of the respondents find the DepEd's response to their needs inadequate or completely lacking.

Among the areas of concern are distribution and collection of modules, training for remote learning, and communication costs.

"Kinocontact namin ang mga bata [through] text and call. Eh 'yung Sim card na binigay hindi puede pang text and call," Grade 10 teacher Maricel Herrera said in the same forum.

[Translation: We contact the children either through text or call, but the SIM cards that were given cannot be used to text or call.]

The DepEd has promised to provide public school teachers a ₱5,000 cash allowance that they can use for communication costs this coming school year.

Access to gadgets, internet main issue for students

The group also conducted a survey among public school students with 1,299 respondents.

Results showed only 1 out of 5 students had access to a computer while less than half of the respondents said they had internet connection at home.

"Kahit konti lang ang respondents puede natin isipin na ang isang katotohanan ay puedeng nagrerepresent ng katotohanan ng karamihan," UP Diliman College of Education professor Liza Campoamor-Olizario said.

[Translation: Even though there are only few respondents, we could say that one truth represents the sentiments of many.]

Another professor said the DepEd should focus more on addressing distance learning concerns over other issues.

"Parang [It's as if] they are oblivious about what's happening. Why are you talking about PISA?," UP Diliman College of Education professor Mercedes Arzadon said.

Arzadon was referring to the Programme for International Student Assessment, where the country previously showed poor ranking in reading comprehension, math, and science.