Gordon optimistic about Leni win: 'It ain't over until it's over'

enablePagination: false
maxItemsPerPage: 10
totalITemsFound:
maxPaginationLinks: 10
maxPossiblePages:
startIndex:
endIndex:

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, May 5) — Sen. Richard Gordon has high hopes about the possibility of a Leni Robredo presidency after joining her in a three-month campaign that is finally drawing to a close.

"It isn't over until it's over," Gordon told CNN Philippines' The Source on Thursday.

"As far as what I see, what I perceive, I don't look at the survey numbers beecause I look at the crowds — it’s spontaneous, people going there on their own, standing for hours and in the heat and rain, bringing their families with them, it's become an opportunity for them to express themselves," he added.

Gordon lauded Robredo's supporters, especially the young people "who are finally involved in the fray."

"I see the reality of the people who really want change. Hundreds of thousands of them. I can see na walang hakot (that no one is being paid to join)," he said. "I’ve been around. It's not just one meeting, but one meeting after the other trying to outdo themselves in terms of coperation of the public who want to go there to be seen and heard."

Before Gordon joined the Leni Robredo-Kiko Pangilinan Team Angat senatorial slate, President Rodrigo Duterte launched tirades againt the lawmaker for leading the probe on the Pharmally medical supply scandal which involved some of Duterte's appointees.

"That's why the President does not want me to win. If I can win, I can go after him again in terms of justice for the people in Pharmally," he said.

Gordon added that Duterte will "be judged by history" after he steps down from office.

Meanwhile, Robredo's spokesperson said that win or lose, Filipinos are already taking part in a "new political movement" that will ensure the next administration's accountability, transparency, and better governance.

READ: Win or lose, Robredo camp sees 'new political movement' under next admin 

Robredo remained at a distant second to archrival and dictator's son Bongbong Marcos in the last presidential preference survey by pollster Pulse Asia, despite drawing up mammoth crowds in her rallies.

But the "Kakampinks" are not losing hope, maximizing the time left to lead rallies and do house-to-house campaigns until May 7, the last day of campaigning.

More than 64 million registered voters are expected to take part and vote for the next president, vice president, lawmakers and local officials in this year's polls.