DepEd asked to issue guidelines, ease workload to prevent burnout among teachers

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A teachers' group urged the Department of Education (DepEd) on Tuesday to issue work schedule guidelines and lessen responsibilities as teachers face burnout with extra workload and hours adjusting to the new online learning scheme (FILE PHOTO)

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, September 22) — A teachers' group urged the Department of Education (DepEd) on Tuesday to issue work schedule guidelines and lessen responsibilities as teachers face burnout with extra workload and hours adjusting to the new online learning scheme.

The Alliance of Concerned Teachers (ACT) pointed out that teachers are juggling between learning the ropes of distance learning and relaying them to students and parents.

Preparations for the upcoming school opening include writing new modules, attending daily webinars and reporting on their mastery of the most essential learning competencies or "what the students need" in the learning process, the group said. This has caused some educators to burn out or become physically and mentally exhausted, it added.

"Hence, we demand that DepEd urgently issue guidelines on work schedules and reduce teachers' load in response to additional time and effort demanded by remote learning," ACT Secretary General Raymond Basilio said in a statement.

The requirements are also eating up much of the teachers' lesson preparation time which is supposedly just two hours, and they are still expected to teach students for another six hours, ACT said.

Teachers have also complained that they are handling more students than before while consultations with parents are being held and school heads are demanding updates at random hours, the group added.

"There really should be safety nets in place, to avoid draining our teachers," the group said.

CNN Philippines has sought for a comment from the DepEd. 

This concern comes on top of other issues raised recently, such as the need for more budget and resources

The start of classes for public schools is set on Oct. 5 amid the COVID-19 pandemic, while those in private institutions have begun ahead.