PH records 1,635 new COVID-19 cases, as total deaths top 5,000

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After two weeks of reporting over 3,000 new infections daily, the Philippines' new COVID-19 cases dip to 1,635, as the death toll exceeds 5,000.

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, September 22) — After two weeks of reporting over 3,000 new infections daily, the Philippines' new COVID-19 cases dipped to 1,635 on Tuesday, the Department of Health said.

This brought the national case count to 291,789, of which 56,097 are active cases or currently ill patients. The DOH noted that 86.4 percent of active cases are mild, 9.2 percent are asymptomatic, 1.3 percent are severe, while 3.1 percent are critical.

The department's latest report showed Metro Manila logged 583 new infections, while Cavite had 102, Iloilo had 97, Rizal had 67, and Cebu had 57.

Another 50 recorded fatalities also raised the death toll to 5,049, while 450 more recoveries were logged, for a total of 230,643 survivors.

Of the newly reported deaths, 38 occurred in September, while 12 took place in the months of April to August, the DOH said.

The department also clarified that it removed 34 duplicates from the total case count, including 21 recoveries. It added that after final validation, 16 cases previously reported as recoveries turned out to be active cases, while one was reclassified as a death.

Among Filipinos abroad, the Department of Foreign Affairs said another six contracted the virus, with the tally of infections now at 10,417. Ten more also recovered, while one more died, raising the recovery count to 6,629 and the deaths to 779.

The Middle East remains to have the highest number of confirmed cases among overseas Filipinos, while the Americas ranks lowest among regions worldwide, according to DFA.

Globally, over 31.3 million people have been infected with COVID-19, of which nearly 965,000 succumbed to the disease, while around 21.5 million have recovered, based on data from the US-based Johns Hopkins University.